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Biologically encoded into our DNA, exposure to ‘nature’ enhances our body’s functioning, development, and restoration; yet we continue to suffer due to a lack of its accessibility within the city. Osteogenesis explores how this knowledge can inform the design of healthcare facilities within the city, re-integrating humans and non-humans to ensure sustainable health for both users and site. Located next to the Royal Children’s Hospital within Royal Park, Parkville, the project targets children who are suffering from bone illness, disease or damage, but who are not in need of immediate hospitalisation. Instead, Osteogenesis provides restorative bone therapy and recovery techniques in affinity with more ‘natural’ urban environments. The project aims to improve the quality of life for these children through therapeutic experiences and submergence within parkland pavilions that complement the existing ecosystem of the site. In achieving this, both patient and park are able to flourish together in optimum health, restoring human and natural ‘bodies’ through moments of interconnected interiority and co-existence.

nina.matyas@yahoo.com

Nina Matyas
Osteogenesis
2016

Nina Matyas
Nina Matyas
Nina Matyas
Nina Matyas

Monash University
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