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DAMIAN MADIGAN

Damian Madigan
Alternative Infill
2016

Bathroom and garage additions commonly occupy the walkways and carriage lanes between Federation housing. If we currently accept infill elements such as these - anomalies that have become commonplace between our established housing over time - then perhaps we can accept a kitchen, dining area, living space, bedroom or entry. Consolidated car parking at the rear of the site and reconfigured bathrooms within the existing dwellings allows these in-between spaces to be given over to alternative domestic uses, providing additional dwellings and increasing social connectivity to the street.

Alternative Infill: a design study of housing intensification, adaptation and choice in the established suburbs of Adelaide

Undertaken by major design project, this PhD research is a design study of infill housing potential in the established suburbs of Adelaide in South Australia. It argues that subjective opposition to the consideration of heritage precincts as potential infill locations is based on
understandable concerns of a perceived loss of character and amenity, but fails to acknowledge the lineage of these inner precincts and their capacity for change. In doing so,
the work recognises established suburbs as having been initially established to provide a variety of housing types and demonstrates ways in which they might return to doing so.

Design experiments put forward the notion that a deep understanding of the Adelaide villa and cottage and their sites has the potential to recognize these early houses as a typology that can continue to meet the evolving needs of the city.

Where the work of this thesis is concerned with identifying the capacity of Adelaide’s established suburbs to accommodate housing diversity and supply, others may find its observations useful to deploy in suburban contexts that are similar–enough in their make–up so as to be broadly comparable with Adelaide. Further, the methods of analysis and exploration used in the work may prove effective for projects with subject matter and contexts that are not directly related to the urban and suburban conditions described in this work, but for which the demonstrated design methodology is transferable.

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Damian Madigan
Alternative Infill Opportunities
2014

Adelaide’s 30-Year Plan proposes the bulk of the city’s new infill housing be created in medium-density medium-rise transit corridor zones (left), without adversely affecting surrounding residential areas (centre and right). The assumption is that this will leave these established areas unaffected by density increases. However, Adelaide’s growth corridors mostly lie within 5km of the city centre, so engaging with infill in Adelaide necessarily means engaging with the city’s old established suburbs. Mapping Adelaide’s limited rail-based transport network (orange) demonstrates that the corridor zones have a limited purchase on public transport and a reliance on inefficient road based transportation.

Damian Madigan
A Divisible Housing Parti
2016

Two existing cottages form one large connected house of up to eight rooms by infilling the space between them and adding a connective two storey rear addition. The eight rooms created accommodate up to four generations, but by simply closing doors to hallways the large house can be used as four smaller dwellings. The key is in the provision of four independent kitchens, bathrooms and living spaces, all of different sizes. Similarly, a new detached double storey dwelling in the backyard is divisible into two through the provision of two kitchens, two bathrooms and two living spaces.

Damian Madigan
House for Four Generations / House for Four Friends
2016

Two existing Victorian-era cottages form one large connected house of up to eight rooms by infilling the space between them and adding a connective two storey rear addition. The eight rooms created accommodate up to four generations, but by simply closing doors to hallways the large house can be used as four smaller dwellings. The key is in the provision of four independent kitchens, bathrooms and living spaces, all of different sizes. The provision of multiple external doors and access to gardens increases amenity and dwelling flexibility.

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