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ALYSIA BENNETT

Alysia Bennett
Granny Work/Shop: Mixed-Use Mode
2014

Receiving an honourable mention in Portland State University’s 2014 International reGENERATION competition, the Granny Work/Shop is proposed as a discrete, small scale mixed-use insertion into suburban driveways. Playing in the planning grey area of sheds, garages and auxiliary dwellings, the project proposes the addition of a granny flat and a workshop as a linear composition in driveways as an expanded model of auxiliary dwelling. Deliberately mimicking the form and materiality of traditional outbuildings, the Granny Work/Shop is proposed as a subtle alternative model to traditional unit subdivision arrangements that has the potential to also provide suburban amenity.

Stealth Density, Parafiction and Legal Loopholes: Ambiguous Approaches to Sustainable Development in Regional Australia

This thesis explores the role of ambiguity in the sustainable renewal of regional cities. A lack of clarity in definition, a disparity in ideology and consequently loose motherhood statements often hinder the realisation of strategic planning objectives. Such issues can lead to stalemates, unsatisfactory compromises and unsustainable outcomes in the development of the built environment. However, it is proposed that this ‘looseness’ could be leveraged as an enabler, not a constraint, to allow architects, planners and citizens alike to overcome current barriers to realising sustainable development.

This research focuses on the exploration and application of ambiguity in the design, realisation and operation of the built environment to facilitate holistically sustainable outcomes. It interrogates top down government objectives whilst uncovering emerging bottom up behaviours in suburban precincts to develop new hybrid approaches to strategic planning that are specific, and thus appropriate, to this unique yet prevalent condition.

In doing so this study proposes an alternative methodology for the development of objectives, directions and targets for the planning and development of Australia’s regional cities. Further, it is proposed that this investigation will initiative a conversation about the wider applicability of ambiguity as a new area of research in architecture.

alysiabennett.com

Alysia Bennett
Granny Work/Shop: Mixed-Use Configurations
2014

Comprised of two pavilions, the rear identified as ‘granny flat’ and the front as ‘garage workshop’, the courtyard between offers a private outdoor space that expands the useable area of dwelling while enabling all spaces access to light and air. Within each pavilion are two wet area modules, a kitchen and a bathroom, which are used to define the internal configurations. With the placement of the kitchen in the front pavilion, the space is able to fluctuate in use across the day to support both residential and commercial/community use.

Alysia Bennett
Mixed-Use Mode
2014

Commended in the 2014 Cemintel 9 Dots Competition, Trojan House is a proposal that aims to challenge current mixed-use typologies for suburban contexts. Sited on the edge of a commercial strip within a residential zone in Sydney’s suburb of Willoughby, the proposal takes advantage of this condition by aesthetically and typologically blending commercial and residential to introduce a new mixed-use insertion. A number of formal and planning devices are deployed to disguise the internal and external potential of the building to enable this development to be surreptitiously inserted into the streetscape.

Alysia Bennett
Mixed-Use Mode in Plan
2014

Once built, the Trojan House is able to reveal its true potential, with capacity to accommodate a range of small, medium or large businesses and/or apartments. In doing so the proposal introduces an idea of scalable mixed use, with apartments or businesses able to expand and contract physically, both horizontally and vertically, and over time. Such expansion is facilitated across traditional property barriers via operable wall panelling systems that hide such links when not in use. Further, the location of sanitary amenities in corridors introduces the potential for further scaling through diurnal shifts in use.

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