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NICKY SEVIOR

Nicky Sevior
Journey Melbourne
2016

A proposed rethink of the Melbourne public transport system, replacing myki with NFC enabled phones. The myki system currently in place is quite unfriendly towards visitors to Melbourne. As it stands they need to pay $6 to gain access to the public transport system and that’s before they start to pay for any fares. It’s also inconvenient for locals who have to find a place to keep their myki that’s quick to find, easy to access but hard to loose. Many people under the age of 30 use their smart phone case to hold their myki, but these can interfere with the myki system, slowing down the process of touching on and off. Journey Melbourne removes this source of friction (the card) and encourages passengers to use the phone they have already in their pocket. Saving money, stress and time.

Hi I’m Nicky I love tackling complex problems, making simple to understand and creating beautiful solutions. Over the past 4 years I've been developing and refining my skills in interaction design, illustration, UX design, animation, 3D modeling and game design. In the last year I’ve been employed by RaRa Pr, Monash University and Dun & Bradstreet as a freelance designer. I’ve also won the Telstra University Innovation Challenge for 2016 with Bin Monsters as Part of a team of students from Monash University. If you’d like to see more of my work check out my website nickysevior.com or instagram instagram.com/nickysevior or email me nsevior@gmail.com

Nicky Sevior
Journey Melbourne
2016

The Journey Melbourne kiosks will replace myki machines, providing a place to top up funds, find new places to visit around Victoria and showing how to access them via the public transport system. The app also allows users to quickly check when they need to top up their funds and do so with their credit cards - freeing up the machines from many users. So the tourism aspect won’t hold up commuters. The Journey Melbourne system will use NFC enabled kiosks, and touch points to interface with passengers’ smart phones to send directions, show users where to download the app, update balances and pay for travel fares.

Nicky Sevior
Bin Monsters
2016

WINNER OF THE TELSTRA UNIVERSITY INNOVATION CHALLENGE 2016

What’s the problem?
Australians throw lots of rubbish on the ground, not even bothering to walk to a bin! Lots of Australians don’t care about or understand the effects of littering. We needed to help trigger a cultural and behavioural shift. Kids are the best way to do this.

Our Solution
We have created a new product – “Bin Monsters”– sensor-laden rubbish bins with big personalities. These monsters like to be fed rubbish so they remember when, where and who fed them and give feedback to kids while they are making the world a cleaner place. The monsters are both a form of gamification as the students compete in “house” teams to see who can collect the most litter and also a form of optimisation as they work out where the bin should be placed to collect the most rubbish.
My Role
Ideation, product design, branding and marketing videos. This included: concept development, logos, storyboards, scripting, voice overs, filming, animation and editing.

Nicky Sevior
HEROES
2016

Everyone believes that they are the Good Guy, the hero of their story. This book explores how this plays out when two civilisations become fearful of each other. The reader plays through this interactive ebook featuring moving illustrations and is asked to make decisions that will benefit their side. Each decision affects the outcome of the story. After they have made their final decision as leader the story flips, and the reader is on the other side of the conflict. They watch as all of the decisions they made before the flip affect the side they are now leading.

Nicky Sevior

HEROES explores how the actions we see as heroic can actually be quite villainous when viewed from the other side. I hope that this book will give the reader a sense of empathy for both sides of the story. I have often been disturbed at the way politicians can so quickly vilify a group of people in order to create fear and authorise extreme treatment of them. I hope that by creating a story that shows that the real enemy is fear, people will use empathy when thinking about conflict.

Nicky Sevior

Monash University
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