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Monash Art Design & Architecture

SEA CHANGE: RUBEN DIGBY-DIERCKS

Ruben Digby-Diercks
Concept Diagram
2016

Our architecture projects are distributed across 6 sites starting with REDIRECT at the Corner of Bones Road + Addiscott Road, and finishing with WAVE at Bells Beach and Winkipop wave breaks. Each project runs vertically, with a key section linking each proposal along the cliff face towards the beach. The projects build upon the existing programs and uses of Bells Beach and accommodate for the increased number of users in 2100.

Project by Monique Woods and Ruben Digby-Diercks

moniquewoods93@gmail.com
rubendigbydiercks@gmail.com

Ruben Digby-Diercks
Frame
2016

This new stopping point frames the initial encounter between the visitor and the wave, creating a sense of anticipation of Bells Beach. The sweeping nature of the architecture references the curvature of the road and directs the eye towards the ideal Bells Beach view. Facilities such as toilets and drink taps act as a starting point for walkers beginning along the Coastal Trail.

Ruben Digby-Diercks
Traverse
2016

Beginning at the overflow carpark, visitors are funnelled underneath Bells Beach Road through a new pedestrian underpass, traversing up towards a public precinct area. Building upon a sense of journey to the wave, this design circulates around the existing amphitheatre, directing visitors towards a 180-degree view of Bells Beach and Winkipop. The angles of the amphitheatre dictate the boundaries of the architecture, creating moments of openness and compression. This initial encounter with the wave allows visitors to engage with the view at Bells Beach from afar, before beginning their journey down to the waters edge.

Ruben Digby-Diercks
Wrap
2016

Moving down along the cliff, the architecture wraps the existing topography to create diverse spaces where visitors can observe the wave. Referencing the history of Bells Beach where spectators once sat in the cliff landscape, the geometry of the architecture also alludes to the clearing of the site by local surfer Joe Sweeney in the 1960s, with the forms symbolising a bulldozed mound of earth. The project extends the boundary of the existing fence line, whilst also creating diverse spaces for visitors to view the Bells Beach event.

Ruben Digby-Diercks
Descend
2016

Utilising the existing cliff topography, this pathway and viewing platform facilitates the descent down the cliff edge. It references the conflicting relationship between the visitors and surfers, with delineated areas including an upper level for standing, a lower level for sitting, and a quick route down to the wave. The tangled nature of the form offers a heightened experience, bringing people closer to the intersection between the cliff landscape and the iconic wave. Positioned on the headland to withstand the gradual decline of the cliff by 2100, this structure will gradually become like a bridge, demonstrating the drastic environmental changes over time.

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