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Monash Art Design & Architecture

The MCMI will be an annex to ACMI at Federation Square with a similar relationship to our NGVI (National Gallery of Victoria International) and the NGVA (National Gallery of Victoria Australia). The holdings and exhibitions will indulge an investigation into a Melbourne-ness with an alliance to all its states film schools and artists. In parallel MCMI will exhibit and explore the relevance of International masterpieces and contemporary works that have influence Melbourne's filmic lineage. The film still on our poster is from 'Dogs in Space' a quintessential junkie movie from the 80s set in Richmond starring Michael Hutchence. The weeks will be atmospherically themed, a film (local or international) and great Melbourne space will be 'wine-matched' to affirm that the two mediums, film and architecture, can both indulge the one visual language.

MELBOURNE CENTRE FOR MOVING IMAGE
UNDERSTANDING & INTERPRETING VISUAL LANGUAGE

MON/THU 2-5PM

MONIQUE BRADY-WARD & SCOTT WOODWARD

MCMI
Alexander McGlade, Section 1:200
2012

Section explaining the relationships between the different stair systems and the way they come together to form a building that is entirely made up of stairs


MCMI
Alexander McGlade, Main entry stair perspective
2012

Main entrance stair showcasing the buildings striking atheistic which references images from pop culture associated with television and cinema.


MCMI
Alexander McGlade, Victoria St Façade Perspective
2012

Perspective showing the main façade of the building made of rotating battens designed to give the illusion of movement to passing cars (a moving image for the moving image)


MCMI
Alexander McGlade, Capsule Cinema
2012

Design for the cinema of the future 1950 inspired by the film ‘Mon Oncle’. Plays on the idea of over design caused by modernist ideals and the people of the times willingness to embrace anything considered ‘modern’ despite its impracticality.


MCMI
Kate Crosby, Axonometric Diagram
2012

The Melbourne Centre for the Moving Image is comprised of three two person cinemas, three two person bars, a twenty person cinema, a twenty person bar and two 200 person cinemas. Each of these components was individually designed using the visual language of a selection of films and video art including Wong Kar Wai’s ‘In the Mood for Love’ and Jacques Tati’s ‘Mon Oncle’. This diagram illustrates how each component is arranged to form the Melbourne Centre for the Moving Image.

MCMI
Kate Crosby, Interior render, ground floor
2012

This render is an interior view on the ground floor of the scheme. It shows the informal nature of the ground floor twenty person bar area and entry space. The twenty person cinema floats above the ground floor, held up by a series of piloti.

MCMI
Kate Crosby, Exterior render
2012

The exterior view captures the entry sequence and overall form of the scheme. The idea of the ‘makeshift’, inspired by the visual language of the film ‘Dogs in Space’ can be seen in the atrium structure with its exaggerated ‘chicken wire’ form. The intention for the brick twenty person bar area is that it can be used in various ways, further drawing on the concept of the ‘makeshift’. The two person cinemas are hidden in the brick silos to the right of the view. The two person bars sit above the two person cinemas, and are intended as a private space for a couple to enjoy. The bars, while private for those inside, act as beacons at the east of the site, for cars driving on Victoria Street towards the city. The aesthetic for the two hundred person cinemas was taken from the film ‘Ghost in the Shell’. The notion of the organic versus the machine in this film can be seen in the design of the cinemas, as metal legs (containing bathrooms and a lift core) penetrate the organic earth and brick below.

MCMI
Kate Crosby, Ground, first, second & third floor plans
2012

The series of floor plans show the arrangement of the different components on the site.

MCMI
Kate Crosby, Section
2012

The east west section cuts through a two person cinema, two person bar, the two hundred person cinemas, the twenty person cinema and the ground floor entry space.

MCMI
Kate Crosby, Model photograph
2012

This view of the model shows how the two person bars act as beacons above the brick silos which contain the two person cinemas. The placement of these beacons on the very public corner on Victoria Street is important, as it is this view that will be seen by hundreds of motorists travelling to the city each day.

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