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Monash Art Design & Architecture

The Chapel typology lends itself to a wide array of interpersonal perceptions capable of inducing the exploration of spirituality and/or self-reflection. Materiality, form, view, mass/void, and spatial sensation (color, texture, light) qualitatively locate the chapel distinctly outside of commercial, residential, or entertainment typologies and demand an engagement between occupant and environment. The contextual obligations of such a typology are thus engaged with the physical qualities of site as well as the social, cultural, and political therefore bridging the tangible with the intangible qualities of context. Notions of icon versus autonomy will be questioned while spatial affects will be intimately calibrated through the deployment of color, light, texture, surface logic (form), and material. The chapel is a place of worship, but also a place to question ... Like a monument, the chapel is a space for remembering as well as a space for forgetting ... a strangely unique nexus among the known and the unknown.

Through a deliberate and intensive integration of landscape/landform and architecture each student is to design a chapel. This chapel can be an inter-faith chapel, a non-denominational chapel, a denominational chapel, or a chapel of unknown faith. The course will examine the integration of landscape and architecture and their complimentary, as well contradictory, effects through mass/void relationships manifest as an 'exotic' skin. The 'exotic' skin will be accountable for the production of spatial affects as well as the negotiation between massing and voiding strategies. Analogous to the human mouth, where facial skin becomes lips which become the inside of our cheeks and gums, the role of the architectural skin will mediate between interior and exterior and assume specific performances in between. This studio will investigate these architectural transitions primarily through tactics of striation, meshes, embossing, and gradients.

Digital modeling and representation techniques will be used for the completion of a comprehensive project. Students will be introduced to grasshopper once a foundational base in Rhino has been established. For all assignment due dates and deliverables please refer to the schedule. Emphasis in this studio is on the complex interaction(s) of landscape and architecture achieved through exhaustive procedures involving complex digital modeling, physical modeling, digital drawing, and hand drawing when appropriate.

This project is to be approached comprehensively in which each student is to consider structure, skin, material, light, color, and texture through overt yet plausible processes of form finding, systems integration, an conceptual development. Students are to consider how the performance of skin, program, and mass/void form cease to maintain native attributes as a strategy of integration between ground and object. Students wi II work iteratively through the exhaustive use of digital and physical models, including hand made, laser cut, and hybrid models. Students will learn Rhino modeling and final presentations are expected to be Rhino based (ie, laser cut models, renderings, precise drawings, and diagrams) and supported by an array of physical developmental models, drawings, and hybrids. Students will be exposed to basic Grasshopper for Rhino, of which I will instruct. You will be expected and taught to develop both landscape and building plans, sections, elevations, organizational and site diagrams, renderings, color palette, material palette, physical model, digital model, and conceptual models.

Time
Monday + Thursday 2-5pm

Location
TBD

Instructor
Clark Thenhaus

HEAD SPACE: Chapel
Aaron Polson, Concept Diagram
2012

Creating a new landscape that incorporates the architecture within it, the building is accessed via a central courtyard and program is then divided based on the notion of body and mind.

HEAD SPACE: Chapel
Aaron Polson, Long Section and Details
2012

Being a large design proposal I wanted to look not only at how the design works at the scale of 1:500 or 1:200 but also at the smaller scale of 1:20 to bring the ideas down to a human scale, resolving details that may get over looked in the design stage.

HEAD SPACE: Chapel
Aaron Polson, Entry courtyard space
2012

Depicts the entry courtyard space that ‘carves’ out the landscape and then links in with two main interior space.

HEAD SPACE: Chapel
Aaron Polson, Sectional Perspective
2012

The design is broken down into three main layers which all have individual surface treatments and language, yet interact with each other on different levels with the roof being pulled to the ground to create light wells.

HEAD SPACE: Chapel
Aaron Polson, ‘Grotto’ Reflective space
2012

The metamorphosis system used as the guiding ground treatment over the undulating landscape comes to a peak as the grid based system breaks into small voronoi fragments, closer to the human scale, in the main reflection space to create a grotto or cave like space.

HEAD SPACE: Chapel
Aaron Polson, Section Through Entry Courtyard
2012

While entrance to the main public space is via a large central courtyard, private program also surrounds this space. This allows for the offices and administration to draw light from the courtyard, have beautiful views out, and also keep constant surveillance over the landscape.

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