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Monash Art Design & Architecture

At present we truly live in the first urban decade. According to the UN, in 2008 the rural/urban tipping point was reached and now more than half of the world’s population live in cities - for the first time in human history! The population of Melbourne’s Metropolitan Area is predicted to grow by 1.8 M by the year 2036*. This figure of growth reflects Melbourne’s dynamism and attractiveness as a City with a future. At the same time, it highlights the great challenge of how and where the city will host these new citizens.
* Planning Document VIC Government: Melbourne 2030: a planning update Melbourne @ 5 million, DEC 2008

Criticism: Sprawl
To handle the pressure of population growth, cities like Melbourne as well as others in the Americas and Europe commonly pushed their limits outwards by expanding into their pristine hinterlands. The usually uncontrolled sprawl created manifold problems: detached low-rise settlements with poor and inefficient infrastructure, social segregation, ever-increasing land consumption and rising costs to expand the infrastructure networks...

Studio Position: Inner Intensification
The studio will challenge this common practice by following the credo that the existing fabric of the inner suburb has the potential to accommodate and usefully structure future growth. Melbourne’s inner suburbs host a large amount of abandoned or underused land and spatial structures. These inner reserves form a great potential for intensification, transformation and the city’s revitalization. During this semester, we will focus on the transformation of one of these central areas, and its urban potential.

Urban Field: Cremorne
Cremorne is an exemplary area to study. The centrally located “forgotten” suburb forms a unique insular enclave within Melbourne’s fabric. Natural elements and important infrastructures define its remarkable geometry. The inner suburb is characterized by its rich industrial heritage, good infrastructure and the proximity and views to the CBD. The vicinity to river, parks and the neighbourhoods of Richmond, South Yarra and Prahran offer further points of attractiveness.

Objective
The aim of the studio is to demonstrate the potential of inner precinct intensification and to envision different concepts of transformation of the existing urban heritage. We want to identify areas and key elements within Cremorne’s urban fabric, which form its genius loci. We want to develop methods to re-activate these elements so that they could act as urban catalysts, prefiguring Cremornes future as a dense and lively urban quarter. We will work on strategies, on how to trace and transform these into new vectors of growth. As such, Cremorne 2025 is to be thought of as a unique and exemplary case study for realising the aspiration for growth in the broader metropolitan region.

CITYSPEAK! + sitegeist
Markus Jung , Maud Cassaignau
Monday + Thursday 3 PM-6PM

CREMORNE2025.1
1
2012

In the Cremorne2025 studio, students were asked to collaboratively envision Cremorne in 2025 as a new, lively, mixed-use, dense and sustainable inner suburb of Melbourne. (more information www.cremorne2025.org)

Students: Tamara Bird, Camilla Burke, Laura Donato, Megan Doody, Lauren Geschke, Nathan Impey, Edwin Ng, Robert Randell, Robert Rosamilia, Hosna Saleem, Joseph Semeredi, Amy Shaw, Julie Sloane, Daniel Wallis, Kathryn Walter, Faridah Yim

CREMORNE2025.1
2
2012

According to the UN, for the first time in history, more population lives now in cities than outside.

Likewise, Melbourne’s Metropolitan population is predicted to grow by 1.8 M til 2036. This figure reflects Melbourne’s attractiveness but also a great challenge. To handle population increase, cities like Melbourne commonly pushed their limits outwards by expanding into their rural areas. This sprawl creates manifold problems: low-density settlements with poor and inefficient infrastructure, social segregation, ever-increasing land consumption and expanding infrastructure networks.

The studio challenged this common practice by following the credo, that the existing inner suburbs have the potential to accommodate future growth.

Students: Tamara Bird, Camilla Burke, Laura Donato, Megan Doody, Lauren Geschke, Nathan Impey, Edwin Ng, Robert Randell, Robert Rosamilia, Hosna Saleem, Joseph Semeredi, Amy Shaw, Julie Sloane, Daniel Wallis, Kathryn Walter, Faridah Yim

CREMORNE2025.1
3
2012

Melbourne’s inner suburbs host a large amount of underused land and buildings. These inner reserves form a great potential for intensification, transformation and city revitalization. Cremorne is an exemplary area to study. The centrally located “forgotten” suburb forms a unique neighbourhood within Melbourne’s fabric, with a great industrial heritage. As an insular enclave, delimited by large infrastructures, it formed an ideal study area: to develop exemplary future oriented strategies for densification, which could be transferred to other urban situations.

Students: Tamara Bird, Camilla Burke, Laura Donato, Megan Doody, Lauren Geschke, Nathan Impey, Edwin Ng, Robert Randell, Robert Rosamilia, Hosna Saleem, Joseph Semeredi, Amy Shaw, Julie Sloane, Daniel Wallis, Kathryn Walter, Faridah Yim

CREMORNE2025.1
4
2012

We based ourselves on studies of the Melbourne’s urban fabric. Inspired by the fact that Melbourne CBD had undergone similar processes in the past, we developed different strategies to increase density and mixity in Cremorne.

Students: Tamara Bird, Camilla Burke, Laura Donato, Megan Doody, Lauren Geschke, Nathan Impey, Edwin Ng, Robert Randell, Robert Rosamilia, Hosna Saleem, Joseph Semeredi, Amy Shaw, Julie Sloane, Daniel Wallis, Kathryn Walter, Faridah Yim

CREMORNE2025.1
5
2012

To develop a cohesive vision, students worked collaboratively with different media: A large site model allowed testing the design strategies in space and diagrams to communicate the vision main concepts.

Students: Tamara Bird, Camilla Burke, Laura Donato, Megan Doody, Lauren Geschke, Nathan Impey, Edwin Ng, Robert Randell, Robert Rosamilia, Hosna Saleem, Joseph Semeredi, Amy Shaw, Julie Sloane, Daniel Wallis, Kathryn Walter, Faridah Yim

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6
2012

A strategic plan shows synthetically the different interventions.

Students: Tamara Bird, Camilla Burke, Laura Donato, Megan Doody, Lauren Geschke, Nathan Impey, Edwin Ng, Robert Randell, Robert Rosamilia, Hosna Saleem, Joseph Semeredi, Amy Shaw, Julie Sloane, Daniel Wallis, Kathryn Walter, Faridah Yim

CREMORNE2025.1
7
2012

Cremone was envisioned as a pedestrian friendly neighbourhood, offering circulation alternatives to individual car in the form of train connections (a new connection to the north was added), car sharing, a ferry connecting Yarra neighbourhoods, and links to existing bike routes.

Students: Tamara Bird, Camilla Burke, Laura Donato, Megan Doody, Lauren Geschke, Nathan Impey, Edwin Ng, Robert Randell, Robert Rosamilia, Hosna Saleem, Joseph Semeredi, Amy Shaw, Julie Sloane, Daniel Wallis, Kathryn Walter, Faridah Yim

CREMORNE2025.1
8
2012

The improvement of open and green spaces, was a central element of the project. Public spaces were joined together in a network with important catalytic projects.

Students: Tamara Bird, Camilla Burke, Laura Donato, Megan Doody, Lauren Geschke, Nathan Impey, Edwin Ng, Robert Randell, Robert Rosamilia, Hosna Saleem, Joseph Semeredi, Amy Shaw, Julie Sloane, Daniel Wallis, Kathryn Walter, Faridah Yim

CREMORNE2025.1
9
2012

Cremorne’s mixity was reinforced by increasing the proportion of residential and community programmes.

Students: Tamara Bird, Camilla Burke, Laura Donato, Megan Doody, Lauren Geschke, Nathan Impey, Edwin Ng, Robert Randell, Robert Rosamilia, Hosna Saleem, Joseph Semeredi, Amy Shaw, Julie Sloane, Daniel Wallis, Kathryn Walter, Faridah Yim

CREMORNE2025.1
10
2012

As part of their overall design, various catalytic projects were developed by individual students, alongside with an urban intervention within Cremorne itself.

Students: Tamara Bird, Camilla Burke, Laura Donato, Megan Doody, Lauren Geschke, Nathan Impey, Edwin Ng, Robert Randell, Robert Rosamilia, Hosna Saleem, Joseph Semeredi, Amy Shaw, Julie Sloane, Daniel Wallis, Kathryn Walter, Faridah Yim

CREMORNE2025.1
11
2012

The activation and occupation of urban space was a central strategy. This approach promoted new ideas for Cremorne and an understanding of the future of Melbourne in a wider sense.

The event held at the end of semester was an opportunity for the students to present their strategies and to have a broader dialogue with the Cremorne community and any other interested parties. This process of communication via exhibition and website www.cremorne2025.org was an integral part of the studio itself.

Students: Tamara Bird, Camilla Burke, Laura Donato, Megan Doody, Lauren Geschke, Nathan Impey, Edwin Ng, Robert Randell, Robert Rosamilia, Hosna Saleem, Joseph Semeredi, Amy Shaw, Julie Sloane, Daniel Wallis, Kathryn Walter, Faridah Yim

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12
2012

Exemplary catalytic projects were: a community hub…

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13
2012

…strategies for the transformation of industrial heritage into mixed habitation…

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14
2012

…an urban gateway at the crossing of Punt and Swan streets…

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15
2012

…and a health hub combined with habitation among others.

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